Origins of the word “Cider”

cider (n.) Look up cider at Dictionary.comlate 13c., from Old French cidre, cire “pear or apple cider” (12c., Modern French cidre), variant of cisdre, from Late Latin sicera, Vulgate rendition of Hebrew shekhar, a word used for any strong drink (translated in Old English as beor, taken untranslated in Septuagint Greek as sikera), related to Arabicsakar “strong drink,” sakira “was drunk.” Meaning gradually narrowed in English to mean exclusively “fermented drink made from apples,” though this sense also was in Old French.

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